This web site was developed in the Community By the Community for the Community by Pembroke Dock Community Web Project it is now managed and funded by Moonlightblue Community Services in conjunction with Your Pembroke Dock Project
Pembroke Dock Town “Our History”
Shops - General
Mid twentieth century Dimond Street.   By the end of the twentieth century, the town's commercial centre had gradually moved east. Traditional shops attract business in the Dimond Street area, while four new supermarkets - Asda, Lidl, Kwiksave and Tesco - have developed near London Road. Picture from Valentine's postcard.
Bush Street  from Albion Square direction               and from the east                                                in both views, trees in the background mark St. John's churchyard. Cambria House (restored 2001-2002) is on the corner beyond Lipton's
Pembroke Street Dimond Street Pembroke Street.
Dimond Street
Pictures by courtesy Tenby Museum & Art Gallery.
Shops -
Some shopping areas in old postcards
Shops - Businessmen
Albion House, in 1837, stood on the site of today's Albion Square car park. Its owner Mr Dawkins was a draper, "a businessman to his fingertips, shrewd and abstemious". When the builder explained a frame around the shop's name would cost an extra half crown (12 p) , Mr Dawkins protested, "A half crown? I'll save it!" Pictures of the shop - now demolished - bear out this story. Note the unframed name. Many early businessmen contributed substantially to Council activities and public life in the town. William Trewent, for example, was the first School Board treasurer. Samuel Allen the photographer encouraged the establishment of the Meyrick Hospital. William Phillips, a coal merchant, started a series of the Market Hall Eisteddfods. Pembroke Dock's Chamber of Commerce dates from 1882. (Sources: Mason 75, 104-111, 136; Peters 67-8; )  Picture reproduced by by courtesy of owner.
Shops - Early street traders
Nineteenth century street sellers, and sometimes shopkeepers, called out special offers on "taters", fish, rabbits, cockles, shrimps and watercress. An elderly milkman, Jimmy Moy, dressed in "broad flapping hat and white smock shirt", did his early morning rounds shouting out "mi ... lk oh!". Milk was carried in two cans, slung from a wooden yolk across the milkman's shoulders. A pie seller offered strollers along Commercial Row,
"Pies, pies, all 'ot Come and see what I've got !" From his basket, meat pies cost twopence, fruit pies a penny..   (Sources: Peters, Sidelights on streets ...)
Llangwm ladies feature in old pictures of Pembroke Dock, selling seafood from baskets
Shops - Later developments
.   By the end of the twentieth century, the town's commercial centre had gradually moved east. Traditional shops attract business in the Dimond Street area, while four new supermarkets - Asda, Lidl, Kwiksave and Tesco - have developed near London Road. Picture from Valentine's postcard.
Mid twentieth century Dimond Street
Shops -
Billheads
Stationery for bills and receipts had attractive and sometimes intricate headings. This selection is from Pembroke Dock businesses between about 1850 and 1930
Stationery for bills and receipts had attractive and sometimes intricate headings. This selection is from Pembroke Dock businesses between about 1850 and 1930
The Sloggett family was prominent .. The Sloggett family was prominent .. The Central Garage, in Park Street and Queen Street, 1936.
Shops - Co-operative shopping, ancient & modern
In 2004, Pembroke Dock Co-op customers used plastic dividend cards  years ago, they were given metal trade tokens. Pembroke Dock Co-op bread delivery
Sharing profits with customers has been a guiding principle of the Co-op movement - . "dividends" are still paid . Pembroke Dock's first purpose built Co- op was in Albion Square. Its opening, in 1893, featured a procession through town. At an evening meeting in the Temperance Hall, three mottos were displayed: In all things, charity In things essential, unity In things doubtful, liberty.  The Co-op moved in the later twentieth century to newer premises in Gordon street, Dimond Street and, finally, near Water Street. After more than a century in the town, the Co-op closed in 2005. The Water Street building now houses the Asda supermarket. 
In 2004, Pembroke Dock Co-op customers used plastic dividend cards
y
ears ago, they were given metal
trade
tokens.
Pembroke Dock Co-op bread delivery  cart by the Bird in Hand Lewis Street c 1910
(Sources: Scott, Proud record...; PT 1 Jun 1893) Pictures by courtesy of: dividend card, Pembroke Dock Co-op (2004) - trade tokens, Pembrokeshire County Council Museum Service - bread delivery cart, Mr Phil Carradice
“Click on most Pictures to Enlarge”